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Dan Wants A Red

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Dan Wants A Red

back to search Back to Search  Style Details 

Beer Style: Irish Red Ale (9D)
Recipe Type: all-grain
Yield: 3.4 US gallons

Irish Red Ale
Beer Color

Description:

A soft sweet whiskey/bourban like aromas.. A nice full body that doesn't fall apart in your mouth but also not so thick that it is creamy and filling. The whiskey flavor becomes more aparent as it reaches higher temps. Light chocolate flavor becomes aparent near the end as beer warms in mouth. It also has a pleasant spice to accompany the chocolate that is mellow. Seems to be at its best once it reaches 50+ degrees Fahrenheit. At first glance the beer appears dark amber, but when it hits the light at the right angle it has a nice transparent blood red. This would be ideal for accompaning a dinner plate. Not sure what though.

Ingredients:

  • 6 lbs 12.3 oz - Pale Malt (2 Row) US (2.0 SRM) (Grain)
  • 10.8 oz - Caramunich II (46.0 SRM) (Grain)
  • 3.6 oz - Caramel Wheat Malt (46.0 SRM) (Grain)
  • 3.6 oz - Chocolate Pale Malt (143.0 SRM) (Grain)
  • 0.5 oz - Willamette [5.5%] - Boil 60 min (Hops)
  • 0.2 oz - Williamette [5.5%] - Boil 30 min (Hops)
  • 0.2 oz - Williamette [5.5%] - Steep 15 min (Hops)
  • 1 pkgs - British Ale (White Labs #WLP005) (Yeast)

Additional Instructions

Boil: 60 Minutes

Beer Profile

Original Gravity: 1.057 (14.0° P)
Final Gravity: 1.019 SG (4.7° P)
Alcohol by Vol: 5.0%
Color SRM: 12.4  Color Sample 
Bitterness IBU: 20.5
Recipe Type: all-grain
Yield: 3.40 US Gallons

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review rating
 Reviewed by Dan on Sun Jul 13 2014

I love red ales so will probably give this a try. However, with an 11+ lbs of grain I can't understand your low batch yield?

review rating
 Reviewed by Dan on Sun Jul 13 2014

I love red ales so will probably give this a try. However, with an 11+ lbs of grain I can't understand your low batch yield?