For the best experience, Login or Register for more features.  Favorites, write reviews, get notifications of new recipes, and more.

Wit Christmas

back to search Back to Search  Style Details 

Wit Christmas

back to search Back to Search  Style Details 

Beer Style: Witbier (16A)
Recipe Type: all-grain
Yield: 5 US gallons

Witbier

Description:

Following is the wit recipe I built and why. Any comments would be appreciated.

Reasons for what you see:

I used the curacao/coriander schedule from this recipe which won Best of Show at the "Spirit of Belgium" competition in 1994.

I went to the Celis page and read up on the hops for Celis white (I was happy to see Cascades).

I like cascades and figured using them and centennial would compliment the curacao citrusness. I picked Saaz for flavor/aroma since the style chart in NCJHB say 'nobel type' for hop flavor/aroma.

I am undecided if I should just buy the Wyeast Belgian White, or if I should culture it from Hoegarrden...

Ingredients:

  • 11 pounds German 2-row pils
  • 9-1/2 pounds flaked wheat
  • 1-1/2 pounds flaked oats
  • 3/4 ounce Centennial 90 minutes
  • 1/2 ounce Cascade 45 minutes
  • 1/2 ounce Cascade 30 minutes
  • 1 ounce Saaz 15 minutes
  • 1 ounce Saaz steep
  • 10 grams coriander in boil
  • 70 grams curacao in boil
  • 2-1/2 grams coriander in secondary
  • Belgian White Wyeast #3944

Additional Instructions

Boil: 50 Minutes

Click to Print Recipe

Procedure:

Mash in 110F (43.3C) 10 min. Boost to 128F (53.3C) 30 mins . Boost to 158F (70C) 50 mins.

Add spice 10 minutes before knockout.

Source:

spacer
 
 
 

 

review rating
 Reviewed by Michael on Mon Nov 7 2016

Found this recipe in my iBrewmaster 2 app and thought I'd try it. In the app the base malt is 2-row pale not pils. Don't think it would matter that much. I also added 4 oz of fresh ground ginger root for fun. The recipe didn't call for rice hulls or anything to add filter to the mash. Since it is a big beer I added 2 lbs of rice hulls. That didn't help though, I had a really stuck mash, one like I'd never had before. Ended up having to sparge small amounts of the mash with lots of stirring. End product has a very slick almost oily mouthfeel. Looking at my OG my efficiency dropped from my standard 70% to 50% so I think that somehow, the base malt was not enough to provide enzymatic conversion of the unmalted wheat and oats. I suggest less wheat and more barley for this beer. Fermentation is going great so I'm hoping it will be palatable in the end.