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Honey Moo Moo

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Honey Moo Moo

back to search Back to Search  Style Details 

Beer Style: Cream Ale (6A)
Recipe Type: all-grain
Yield: 4 US gallons

Cream Ale
Beer Color

Description:

Sweet beer with a moderate hop flavor that allows for a sweetened honey flavor. Crystal clear yellow that pours with tight bubbles that form a creamy head. Crisp and refreshing beer.

Ingredients:

  • Grains & Adjuncts
  • 4.00 lbs Pale Malt (2 Row) US 60 mins
  • 14.00 ozs Rice, Flaked 60 mins
  • 3.00 lbs Rahr 6-Row 60 mins
  • 2.00 ozs Briess 2-Row Caramel 60L 60 mins
  • 12.00 ozs Honey @ end of boil.
  • Hops
  • 0.50 ozs Williamette 60 mins
  • 0.25 ozs Columbus (Tomahawk) 5 mins
  • Yeasts
  • 1.00 pkg Safale US-05
  • Additions
  • 0.30 oz Irish Moss 15 mins Boil
  • Mash Profile
  • Sacch' Rest: 60 min @ 152.0°F Add 10.00 qt ( 1.25 qt/lb ) water @ 170.8°F
  • Sparge: rinse grains with 14.5 qt of 170.0°F water.

Additional Instructions

Boil: 60 Minutes
Primary Ferment: 7
Secondary Ferment: 10

Beer Profile

Original Gravity: 1.052
Final Gravity: 1.013
Alcohol by Vol: 5%
Color SRM: 4.9  Color Sample 
Bitterness IBU: 15.78
Recipe Type: all-grain
Yield: 4.00 US Gallons

Click to Print Recipe

Procedure:

Recommend using a mash ton and following all steps above sat the times noted. Ensure honey is added once flame is off at the end of boil.

Source:



review rating
 Reviewed by Lurch on Wed Jun 3 2015

Considering this recipe for a 3 star rating a few days after it was posted, I'm assuming that the eater either have it 3 stars for my failure to spell "tun" correctly (auto correct fail!), or he made the same exact recipe before. I thought it was and original... It's not perfect, but worthy of 4 stars in my opinion. My only claim would be over-carbonation over te after bottling.

review rating
 Reviewed by Jim on Mon Jun 1 2015

Not bad recipe , but just to clarify it's called a mash tun , not ton. Just fyi.